How Motley Works

It takes a lot of work to make something look simple. 

Here’s how Motley works. 

  1. We commission exceptional independent designers
  2. Our skilled craftsmen make their designs
  3. We sell them to you at a fair price

Easy as 1,2,3.  

But how is this special or different?

Jewellery designers have a unique problem. 

If they want to launch their own business, they have to buy their own materials. This is expensive. So, many of them only work on bespoke projects in solid gold and precious metals, where they get guaranteed pay.  

Or, they work for big companies that don’t give the designers credit where credit’s due (it’s called ‘white labelling’ in the industry). 

How does this impact me?

Unless you’ve got lots of money, truly great original design is out of reach. 

What does Motley do to solve this?

We take care of the barriers designers face. We pay for the materials and craftsmanship upfront, and find them customers. With us, they just need to do what they do best – design jewellery. And we pay them for that too. 

Isn’t all jewellery designed by someone?

Yes and no. Some brands just pick their jewellery out of a factory’s existing catalogue of standard designs, while others will have in-house designers that don’t get the credit they deserve. 

How do you make high quality jewellery affordable?

Silver, in a word. It’s the secret sauce that makes the Motley model possible. Far more affordable than gold, it’s a precious metal that’s durable and hypoallergenic. 

Fine jewellery designers don’t usually work in silver, because the upfront quantities you have to buy silver in are too large.  

And the gold pieces?

We use a special plating technique called vermeil, a thick layer of 2.5 microns of 18 karat gold plated on sterling silver. With the right care, your vermeil jewellery can be worn for a long time and replated in perpetuity. 

More on our materials here. 

How do you find your makers?

We seek out the best craftsmen from all over the world based on their expertise. We only ever produce small batches, working with workshops who value the quality of craftsmanship and materials over speed. 

We visit their workplaces regularly, and they all sign up to our code of ethics. More on this here. 

This all sounds too good to be true. Is there a catch?

We simply had a great idea for a radical improvement to how mankind’s favourite wearables can be made and sold. No catch, just a lot of self-righteous back patting.